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  • Conference Events - 18 March 2021


  • Conference Program - 19 March 2021


  • Janine Allis is not your everyday success story. In her 20s, she travelled the world working as a nanny in France and working for the rock icon David Bowie on his yacht. Returning to Australia, Janine met and married ‘the one’ and they founded Boost Juice in 2000. With a vision to “do retailing differently”, Boost Juice delivers a unique customer experience based on the “love life” philosophy and getting more fruit and vegetables in people’s diet, which they are achieving, with over 2 million smoothies or juices sold every month. Taking Boost Juice from an idea to an international Australian iconic brand with four kids in tow has not been an easy path. Along that journey there have been successes, failures, huge highs and equally huge lows, but the most important things are the mistakes made and lessons learnt along the way. And as if that wasn’t enough! Janine is also Executive Director at Retail Zoo, which includes the brands Salsa's Fresh Mex, CIBO Espresso and Betty's Burgers & CONCRETE CO, employing almost 7000 people across a total of 600 stores.
    Keynote Presentation

  • Faraway is found beyond the city boundaries. It’s a place where sheep graze in scrubby bluebush hills and where the McBride family began its pastoral dynasty more than one hundred years ago. AJ & PA McBride is one of the country’s largest wool producers, running in excess of 250,000 merino sheep across ten properties in South Australia and Victoria, and covering more than 1.4 million hectares. Celebrating 100 years in business and into its 6th generation, there are very few family members working in the business, but all 106 shareholders of the AJ and PA McBride company are descendants of Albert McBride, who bought the group’s first Faraway Hill sheep station near Burra in South Australia’s Mid North in 1902. From Faraway Hill to the modern multi-million dollar livestock enterprise of Telopea Downs, this family company has remained committed to the fortunes of the fleece. Join Keith McBride and Nathan Wessling as they discuss: how the diversification of income streams and locations has protected the company from falling prices in different commodities and unpredictable climatic conditions; how they retain and promote positive shareholder engagement; and their goal to become the largest wool producer in Australia.
    Keynote Presentation

  • In 1885, Arnold Wittner had a one-way ticket from his hometown in Romania to the USA to join his brother, presumably to start a family business. After accidentally boarding the wrong boat and four months at sea, Arnold arrived in Australia. Soon after he bought a horse and cart and began trading consignment lots. However, in 1912 Arnold acquired a mixed consignment lot which he sold - all but the £100 worth of wrongly sized and out-of-style shoes, which he gave to 17-year-old son HJ. Arnold leased the shop for HJ in Leads Street Footscray and said, ''Now you're in the shoe business son.'' In the 107 years since, and with the family name above the door, Wittner has become synonymous with quality and style. But the family’s motivations have changed. To pursue their planned exit from the business, Wittner is restructuring and is taking on a capital partner to expand the Wittner brand across the globe. Join Michael as he shares: the key pivot points which have led to the growing success of the brand; the importance of having a flexible advisory board to navigate major changes, and what he has learnt about managing risks, costs and personal guarantees.
    Keynote Presentation

  • In 1893 Charles (Chas) Clarkson took the brave and courageous step of setting up the first Clarkson outlet – a shop fitting and signage business in London's Charing Cross that he started with his brother, Aldo. At the turn of the 20th century, Chas brought his family to Sydney where he set up his signage and ticket writing shop at 125 William Street. In the 1960s Chas Clarkson revolutionised how customers shopped in store with help yourself displays. Their new shop windows in the 1970s changed the way retailers displayed their products. Then in the early 90s, when demand declined for traditional retail ticket items, they created the Chas Clarkson Christmas concepts division. The rest as they say is history. Chas Clarkson create magical and memorable experiences that help bring joy to Australian families at the most special time – installing hundreds of Santa experiences, thousands of Christmas trees and millions of lights in every color of the rainbow. Over 60% of all major shopping destinations in Australia have a Chas Clarkson experience. The Christmas tree in the QVB? That’s theirs too. Join 4th generation siblings, Tim Clarkson, Mike Clarkson and Sally Clarkson as they share: what defines them as a business – forming the foundation of everything they do; how they stay ahead in a competitive market that is driven by innovation; and how the fourth generation define their own success within the legacy of the business.
    Keynote Presentation

  • Charles Dickens wrote “it was the best of times; it was the worst of times…” these words could also be used to describe family businesses with human dynamics often tearing many families apart. Throw into a “normal” nuclear family business dynamic a blended family and statistically the odds go against a peaceful existence. This panel brings together four women with experience both personally and professionally with divorce, second marriages, divorce again, business splits and the large sale of a successful IT business to a publicly listed company. The panel will discuss: how to protect your business through a divorce; Estate Planning considerations from practical experience with biological and step children; and the importance of managing perception v reality in regards to the businesses financial success.
    Parallel Session

  • When Harry Hammon first transformed a disused coal mine into Australia’s first cable car tourist attraction in 1945, he planted the seed for what would become Scenic World; a thriving tourism attraction in the Blue Mountains. That seed blossomed under three generations of the Hammon family’s leadership, culminating in the family business winning the right to manage the world renowned BridgeClimb in 2018. Hammons Holdings has celebrated many great milestones over more than 75 years of operation. Scenic World hit 1.1 million annual visitors in 2019, making it the most visited privately owned tourist attraction in Australia. At the same time, the family business embarked on a visionary plan to evolve BridgeClimb – both businesses which rely heavily on international visitation. Then the worst bushfire season on record swept across NSW, forcing the closure of Scenic World for five days and making its mark on visitation to BridgeClimb. The impact of the fires was compounded by floods in NSW, before COVID-19 put the world on hold and forced both businesses to close for three months. 200 workers stood down at Scenic World; another 200 at BridgeClimb, and the longer term impacts are yet to unfold. Join Anthea Hammon and David Hammon for a discussion with Robert Powell as they touch on: how this iconic Australian family business built the resilience to withstand multiple threats to its survival; how the family managed its succession journey across three generations; and how best practice in family governance keeps the family and the business on track in challenging times.
    Parallel Session

  • Family businesses often struggle with the potentially conflicting needs of present and future generations when setting business strategies. A Green Ocean Strategy prepares a family business to implement complementary actions that simultaneously align business and family governance, social-community cohesion, financial strength and environmental responsibility to achieve intergenerational equity. This presentation aims to challenge the traditional family business model by the presenters sharing strategies and best practices in transformative design that have successfully led to an alignment between business vison and activities, business governance and structure, and generational continuity through family governance. You will gain insights into setting and implementing sustainable and ethical business strategies that support long-term value creation through effective decision-making between current and future generations.
    Parallel Session

  • Two multi-generational family business leaders recognised the need for their businesses to remain relevant and competitive, embarking on initiatives to survive into the next generation. Upon taking the helm of the national agriculture packaging business, Colquhouns, Robert Colquhoun’s success was driven by the legacy of the preceding four generations. And to create new value for second generation business, Forty Winks, non-executive director Cameron van den Dungen launched start-up business, Sleeptite. Hear each leaders approach to transforming their business; their unique challenges, opportunities and lessons learnt.
    Parallel Session

  • In every business, a crisis can be just a short moment away. An unexpected or out-of-the-ordinary event could turn your world upside down and threaten your brand’s reputation. Some crises have cost companies vast amounts of money in additional costs and lost profits. But a crisis only spins out of control if you haven’t planned for it. And you won’t have time to start planning when the crisis has already broken. La Porchetta is a household name in Australia and New Zealand, with a 30 plus year history of franchised restaurants and a loyal customer base. The brand has faced a number of challenges in that time, including the sudden loss of its co-founder in 2010. Sara Pantaleo, former CEO of La Porchetta, will draw on her own experience to talk about: the impact a sudden crisis had on the business; how she managed the business through the crisis; and the importance of having a crisis management plan.
    Parallel Session

  • FACT – 70% of all wealth transitions from one generation to the next fail. 95% of these wealth transition failures are caused by one or more factors including lack of trust within the family, communication issues within the family, the next generation not being prepared, or a lack of a clear purpose or mission of the family’s wealth. Family dynamics play a much greater role in successful wealth transfers than previously understood. There is a reason behind the saying…”Shirtsleeves to Shirtsleeves in three generations”. Key to success is preparing the family members today for their roles tomorrow. Part of that preparation is giving family members responsibilities in relation to the family’s assets, whether or not that involves a role within the business. Join Brad Scott as he examines the relationship between the family office and family dynamics and shares family business case studies. Brad will also highlights the criteria for success, processes used to ensure success and how to guarantee failure.
    Parallel Session

  • Coopers is a brewing family. It’s in their blood. Their passion for brewing has kept the family together and helped the business through economic recessions, wars, government imposts, changing tastes, pandemics and the occasional hostile takeover bid. After dedicating over 150 years to the art of brewing, Coopers is an icon. With the incumbent generation in their 50’s and 60’s, it’s time to plan for the next transition. Australia’s leading family of brewers has restructured its senior management to enable the 5th generation to transfer from commercial to custodial roles while the upcoming 6th generation find their feet. The role of non-family executives will be key to this process. Join Melanie and her niece Louise as they share: how the business is transitioning from the 5th to the 6th generation, the measures they have put in place to future-proof the business, and what it feels like to be the custodians of the Coopers legacy.
    Keynote Presentation

  • It took twenty years, five failed businesses and three unsuccessful careers to build the overnight success that is $100m global online wine startup Vinomofo. Vinomofo started life back in 2007 in the garage of brothers-in-law and fellow wine geeks, Justin Dry and Andre Eikmeier, who just wanted to do something cool for wine lovers and producers. Growing increasingly concerned with the way the world was headed, André knew he could either keep complaining about it at dinner parties, or he could try to do something about it. In 2018, André founded Good Empire, a global community platform for projects that unite and empower people to live more connected, sustainable, and impactful lives. André shares a very real and raw account of the failures, triumphs and hard and vital lessons that have shaped his business ventures and him as an entrepreneur. This is the real truth - the fears - the impact of being an entrepreneur on friends and family - the soul-searching. Andre will share how to create a sustainable, enduring human culture, that is not afraid to fail; the Human Business Manifesto - a model for changing the culture of business for good; and a new perspective on life that just may be the secret to happiness.
    Keynote Presentation

  • Post Conference Events - 20 March 2021